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Monday, May 4, 2020 | History

5 edition of King Alfred"s Old English Medieval Academy Prose Translation found in the catalog.

King Alfred"s Old English Medieval Academy Prose Translation

by Patrick O"Neill

  • 231 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Medieval Academy of Amer .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • History: World

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL11414595M
    ISBN 100915651130
    ISBN 109780915651139

    King Alfred's Old English prose translation of the first fifty Psalms. Medieval Academy Books, The Medieval Academy of America: Cambridge MA. Potter, Simeon. On the relation of the Old English Bede to Werferth's Gregory and to Alfred's translations. Prague: Mémoires de la société royale des science de Bohême, Classe des lettres.   century is that of King Alfred the Great. He appended to his laws a free translation of the Ten Commandments and an abridgment of the enactments of Exodus 21– These actually constitute the earliest surviving examples of a portion of the Old Testament in Old English prose..

    The translator (traditionally identified with King Alfred) freely adapts the Latin for a new audience: the Roman Fabricius, for example, becomes the Germanic weapon-smith Weland. The translation replicates Boethius's alternation of prose and verse--only in this case Old English prose . "King Alfred," Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Frantzen, Allen. King Alfred (Boston, ).. King Alfred the Great () was king of the West is the only English monarch to be called "the Great." He defeated the Vikings and united the Anglo-Saxons, leaving his son and grandsons to rule over a united England.

    King Alfred is the only king in English history to be deemed worthy of the title of ’the Great’. There are reasons for that and these reasons lie not only in his campaigns against the Vikings and the establishing of the navy but also much deeper, in the reforms Alfred passed in his lands that enabled the populace to educate themselves. Cambridge Core - English Language and Linguistics: General Interest - The Cambridge History of Early Medieval English Literature - edited by Clare A. Lees.


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King Alfred"s Old English Medieval Academy Prose Translation by Patrick O"Neill Download PDF EPUB FB2

About the Author. Alfred the Great ( – 26 October ,) born at Wantage, Berkshire, was the fifth son of Aethelwulf, king of the West Saxons. As king of Wessex from toAlfred defended his kingdom against the Vikings.

Read by: O’Neill, Patrick P, O'Neil, King Alfred’s Old English Prose Translation of the First Fifty Psalms, Edited by PATRICK P. O’NEILL, Medieval Academy Books, Medieval Academy of America.

Boethius's Latin dialogues found a receptive audience in Anglo-Saxon England, where they were translated into Old English some time around The translator (traditionally identified with King Alfred) freely adapts the Latin for a new audience: the Roman Fabricius, for example, becomes the Germanic weapon-smith Weland.5/5(6).

Alfred. King Alfred’s Old English Prose Translation of the First Fifty Psalms. Edited by Patrick P. O’Neill. Cambridge, MA: Medieval Academy of America, Find this resource: Google Preview; WorldCat; Alfred. King Alfred’s Version of St. Augustine’s Soliloquies. Edited by Thomas A. Carnicelli. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press Author: Sharon M.

Rowley. His research centres on literary interactions between the English and Celtic worlds during the Middle Ages. His book, King Alfred's Old English Prose Translation of the First Fifty Psalms, was awarded the Sir Israel Gollancz Prize () by the British Academy.

Mary P. Richards is Professor of English Emerita at the University of Delaware, USA. Alfred (b. /–d. ), King of Wessex, styled himself King of the Anglo-Saxons before his death. He was the youngest of at least six children, five of them sons, born to King Æthelwulf of Wessex; his mother was Osburh.

King Alfred's Old English prose translation of the first fifty Psalms (Book, ) [] Your list has reached the maximum number of items. Please create a new list with a new name; move some items to a new or existing list; or delete some items.

Your. O'Neill, Patrick P./ King Alfred's Old English Prose Translation of the First Fifty Psalms. Edited by PATRICK P. O'NEILL. Edited by PATRICK P. O'NEILL. Medieval Academy Books.

King Alfred’s Preface to the Translation. of Gregory’s Pastoral Care. Alfred the Great was King of Wessex from to He is remembered today chiefly for his success in preventing the Danes from conquering England, and for fostering a revival of learning in his kingdom.

A truly noble character, Alfred was one of those rare monarchs who have excelled both in the arts of war and in those of peace. The earliest extensive body of English prose-writing dates from the reign of King Alfred, who personally translated Latin texts with the assistance of his court scholars, and commissioned others to contribute translations for his program of educational re.

This study of early Old English translation attempts a conceptual refocusing of its function as a literary activity in general and more specifically in connection with King Alfred the Great’s programme. It traces influences on the theory of translation and on how translation was perceived from Cicero and Horace to Alfred, and it concentrates on the prefatory material and translation practice.

Alfred the Great (Old English: Ælfrēd, Ælfrǣd, ' Elf -counsel' or 'Wise-elf'; between and – 26 October ) was King of Wessex from to c.

and King of the Anglo-Saxons from c. to He was the youngest son of King Æthelwulf of Wessex. King Alfred’s Old English Prose Translation of the First Fifty Psalms (Medieval Academy of America, ) Treschow, Michael, Paramjit Gill and Tim B. Schwartz. K ing Alfred’s Scholarly Writings and the Authorship of the First Fifty Prose Psalms.

PROEM []. King Alfred was the interpreter of this book, and turned it from book Latin into English, as it is now done. Now he set forth word by word, now sense from sense, as clearly and intelligently as he was able, in the various and manifold worldly cares that oft troubled him both in mind and in body.

King Alfred the Great felt that this text was one of the "books that are most necessary for all men to know" and included it as part of his program of translation of major Latin texts. This is the second printed version of the Consolation after that of Christopher Rawlinson in   Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, lat.

(the ‘Paris Psalter’) is a unique manuscript dating to around The main texts of the manuscript are the Latin Psalms with facing Old English translations: the first fifty Psalms are translated into Old English prose and another translator rendered the last hundred Psalms in Old English verse.

Alfred the Great's translation of Gregory the Great's Pastoral Care was the first work produced as part of a programme of translation of key works from Latin into Old English. Gregory's Pastoral Care (Regula pastoralis or De cura pastorali) was composed in the s, shortly after he became pope, as a handbook for his bishops and other leaders detailing how they should teach and guide their people.

Pages CHAPTER VII METRE II. 5 - METRE II. 7 The good old times - Metre ii. 5 in English verse - Prose ii. 6, the desire for power and dignities - Prose ii. 7, fame and glory - The shortness of a lifetime ; of ten thousand years compared with eternity - Alfred's view of earthly power - Metre ii.

7 in English verse - Alfred and Way land. Alfred’s method of translation is explored in the light of the skopos theory and assessed in terms of adequacy to the socio-cultural and political context of 9th century Anglo-Saxon Wessex. Naturally, the initial format of the thesis has been made so as to facilitate reading for a more general public.

O’Neill, Patrick. King Alfred’s Old English Prose Translation of the First Fifty Psalms (Medieval Academy of America, ) Treschow, Michael, Paramjit Gill and Tim B.

Schwartz. King Alfred’s Scholarly Writings and the Authorship of the First Fifty Prose. Tonight I will talk about the first Standard English, a King’s English not a Queen’s English, because it was the English of King Alfred. He died inand his English remained Standard English until it received a blow in put us at a great remove from King Alfred, and we remain separated from him not only by time but also by the.The translation even replicated Boethius’s alternation of prose and verse—only in this case with Old English prose alternating with alliterative verse.

Chaucer and Queen Elizabeth each turned The Consolation of Philosophy into English, giving it an unrivalled pedigree of translators, but King Alfred was the first to bring it to a wider. This article examines the first fifty Old English prose psalms in Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, fonds lat.

(ff. 1–63). Composed in an early West Saxon dialect, they are located amongst the uniquely early West Saxon works of the Alfredian canon. Within this Alfredian literary milieu (c. –), the political model of Alfredian kingship appears informed by a consistent.